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The Mistrust of Science

The Mistrust of Science

Relatively Interesting June 14, 2016 0

The following was delivered as the commencement address at the California Institute of Technology, on Friday, June 10th, by Atul Gawande, a surgeon and public-health researcher, who became a New Yorker staff writer in 1998.  In it,

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10 Cognitive Biases that Affect Your Everyday Decisions

10 Cognitive Biases that Affect Your Everyday Decisions

Relatively Interesting April 26, 2016 0

We make countless decisions every day. Some may be life changing, while others are so trivial we’re not even aware they’re taking place.  In scenarios we haven’t faced before, pre-existing biases – formed based

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The evolution of education in the digital space

The evolution of education in the digital space

Relatively Interesting December 16, 2015 1

A massive shift in how education is delivered in our modern world is underway.  Though the shift has widely and vociferously been resisted by the established, legacy institutions, the forces of economics and educational

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Making poor decisions?  Blame these 20 cognitive biases.

Making poor decisions? Blame these 20 cognitive biases.

Relatively Interesting September 27, 2015 0

You’ve made a poor decision in life.  What to do?  Who to blame?  Yourself?  Well, yeah – there’s a pretty good chance that one of these 20 cognitive biases have influenced one or more

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Critical Thinking For Life:  A Review of Total Motivation Math and Reading Resources

Critical Thinking For Life: A Review of Total Motivation Math and Reading Resources

Relatively Interesting July 20, 2015 1

Critical thinking is a form of thinking that is disciplined, clear, rational, open-minded, and informed by evidence.  It is the mental process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating information to

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Clearing up confusion between correlation and causation

Clearing up confusion between correlation and causation

Relatively Interesting April 2, 2015 0

Jonathan Borwein (Jon), University of Newcastle and Michael Rose, University of Newcastle UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH: What do we actually mean by research and how does it help inform our understanding of things? Today we look

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Graham’s Hierarchy of Disagreement

Graham’s Hierarchy of Disagreement

Relatively Interesting January 11, 2015 0

Paul Graham, a programmer, essayist, and venture capitalist, proposed a “disagreement hierarchy” in a 2008 essay entitled, “How to Disagree”, placing different kinds of argument into a seven-point hierarchy and observing that, “If moving up

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Logical and Rhetorical Fallacies Explained

Logical and Rhetorical Fallacies Explained

Relatively Interesting October 17, 2014 1

A logical fallacy is a error in reasoning due to a misconception or presumption. If the assumptions of an argument are true, the argument can still be rendered invalid if the logic used to come

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Does brain training actually work?

Does brain training actually work?

Relatively Interesting May 12, 2014 1

–Update Jan 18, 2016–  The creators and marketers of the Lumosity “brain training” program have agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges alleging that they deceived consumers with unfounded claims that Lumosity games can

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7 Ways to Identify Pseudoscience

7 Ways to Identify Pseudoscience

Relatively Interesting May 2, 2014 2

How can you tell if a something qualifies as science or if it falls into the realm of pseudoscience? It’s not always easy.  Clever marketers have found ways to pass off shady work as legitimate,

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